What quantity of food to give?

What quantity of food to give?

Find out more about starch in the article « STARCH ».

The recommended quantities in the table below have been calculated taking into consideration both the starch provided, as well as the size of the stomach (do not exceed 400g/100kg live-weight of feed per meal).

Preventing digestive disorders

Situation : Preventing colics and hindgut acidosis
Maximum limit per meal In practice : Maximum limit per meal (500kg adult horse)
150 g /100 kg
live-weight
Adult 3 litres (2 kg)
Adult Energy 3 litres (2 kg)
Racing 3 litres (2 kg)
Training 3 litres (2 kg)
Adult Specific Energy 3 litres (2 kg)
Breeding 3 litres (2 kg)
Situation : Preventing gastric ulcers
Maximum limit per meal In practice : Maximum limit per meal (500kg adult horse)
100 g /100 kg
live-weight
Adult 2.5 litres (1.8 kg)
Adult Energy 2 litres (1.4 kg)
Racing 2.5 litres (1.8 kg)
Training 2.5 litres (1.8 kg)
Adult Specific Energy 3 litres (2 kg)
Breeding 2.5 litres (1.8 kg)
Situation : To accompany gastric ulcers treatments
Maximum limit per meal In practice : Maximum limit per meal (500kg adult horse)
50 g /100 kg
live-weight
Adult Specific Energy 2.5 litres (1.8 kg)

Preventing osteoarticular disorders

Situation : Preventing osteoarticular disorders in the foal
Maximum limit per meal In practice : Maximum limit per meal (500kg adult horse)
100 g /100 kg
live-weight
Breeding (pregnancy) 2.5 litres (1.8 kg)
Foal (6 months) 1.4 litres (950 g)
Foal (12 months) 2 litres (1.4 kg)
Breeding (12 months) 1.5 litres (1 kg)
Breeding (18 months) 2 litres (1.4 kg)

Preventing muscular diseases

Situation : Preventing exertion myopathy in a non-predisposed horse
Maximum limit per meal In practice : Maximum limit per meal (500kg adult horse)
100 g /100 kg
live-weight
Adult 2.5 litres (1.8 kg)
Adult Energy 2 litres (1.4 kg)
Racing 2.5 litres (1.8 kg)
Training 2.5 litres (1.8 kg)
Adult Specific Energy 3 litres (2 kg)
Breeding 2.5 litres (1.8 kg)
Situation : Horses suffering from RER
Maximum limit per meal In practice : Maximum limit per meal (500kg adult horse)
50 g /100 kg
live-weight
Adult 1.2 litres (860 g)
Adult Energy 1 litre (700 g)
Racing 1.2 litres (860 g)
Training 1.2 litres (860 g)
Adult Specific Energy 2.5 litres (1.8 kg)
Breeding 1.2 litres (860 g)
Situation : Horses suffering of PSSM
Maximum limit per meal In practice : Maximum limit per meal (500kg adult horse)
15 g /100 kg
live-weight
Adult 0.4 litre (260 g)
Adult Specific Energy 0.8 litre (540 g)
Breeding 0.4 litre (260 g)

Preventing and managing metabolic disorders

Situation : Limit the metabolic response in a healthy horse
Maximum limit per meal In practice : Maximum limit per meal (500kg adult horse)
100 g /100 kg
live-weight
Adult 2.5 litres (1.8 kg)
Adult Energy 2 litres (1.4 kg)
Racing 2.5 litres (1.8 kg)
Training 2.5 litres (1.8 kg)
Adult Specific Energy 3 litres (2 kg)
Breeding 2.5 litres (1.8 kg)
Situation : Managing a horse suffering from a metabolic disease
Maximum limit per meal In practice : Maximum limit per meal (500kg adult horse)
30 g /100 kg
live-weight
Adult 0.7 litre (500 g)
Adult Specific Energy 1.5 litre (1 kg)
Breeding 0.7 litre (500 g)
Situation : Preventing laminitis in a predisposed horse
Maximum limit per meal In practice : Maximum limit per meal (500kg adult horse)
30 g /100 kg
live-weight
Adult 0.7 litre (500 g)
Adult Specific Energy 1.5 litres (1 kg)
Breeding 0.7 litre (500 g)
Situation : Managing a case of acute laminitis
Maximum limit per meal In practice : Maximum limit per meal (500kg adult horse)
15 g /100 kg
live-weight
Adult 0.4 litre (260 g)
Adult Specific Energy 0.8 litre (540 g)
Breeding 0.4 litre (260 g)

TO LEARN MORE

1. Jansson, A., Sandin, A. & Lindberg, J. Digestive and metabolic effects of altering feeding frequency in athletic horses. Equine Comp. Exerc. Physiol. 3, 83–91 2006).
2. Steelman, S., Michael-Eller, E., Gibbs, P. & Potter, G. Meal size and feeding frequency influence serum leptin concentration in yearling horses. J. Anim. Sci. 84, 2391 (2006).
3. Pratt-Phillips, S. et al. The Effect of Feeding Two or Three Meals Per Day of Either Low or High Nonstructural Carbohydrate Concentrates on Postprandial Glucose and Insulin Concentrations in Horses. J. Equine Vet. Sci. 34, 1251–1256 (2014).

TO KNOW

  • Increasing the frequency of concentrate distribution improves assimilation of oils and minerals1.
  • Increasing the frequency of concentrate distribution lowers the postprandial glycaemia and insulinaemia, and normalises serum leptin (satiety hormone) concentrations.1-3. This allows the horse’s metabolism to get closer to what it is when out at grass and grazing2.